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Fikse FM/5 Wheels: When I first saw the Fikse FM/5 wheels, I knew I had to have them. They totally changed the appearance of the car. They are a very light wheel and strong wheel. The workmanship and attention to detail is excellent. I went with 17x9.5 wheels on the front and 17x11 wheels on the rear.


Nitto Tires: I went with 275/40-17 Nitto 555's on the front, and 315/35-17 Nitto Drag Radials on the rear. I needed a drag radial because my car just couldn't hook on the street with a regular tire. The converter was too much for my old AVS Sports to handle. On hard acceleration, they would just spin. The drag radials spin a little then hook. It's a great feeling on the street. They are a reduced tread depth tire and are made with a very soft rubber, so don't expect them to last very long.

Eibach Lowering Springs: I never planned to lower my car, but with the big wheels the car looked stupid at the stock height. It looked like a 4X4 car. The wheels made it look even higher. The ride is a little more harsh, but it's not as bad as I thought it would be. I am very happy with them. Cornering ability has also been increased. A lot of people told me my car would scrape a lot with the springs, but I haven't found that to be the case. They lowered the car about an inch and a half on the front and rear.

Road Tech Adjustable Panhard Bar: When you lower an F-body, the rear axle shifts to the drivers side slightly due to the suspension design. In order to center the axle again, you need an adjustable panhard bar.

LS1 Motorsports Direct Flow Air Lid: This replaces the restrictive stock lid with a free flowing design that allows more air to enter the engine. The lid eliminates the stock baffles and cleans up the path the air follows as it enters the engine.

Solid Black rear panel: The '93 thru '97 Formula's had a solid black panel between the tail lights. On the LS1 Formulas, Pontiac gave them the same panel as the base Firebird. It looks good, but I wanted a solid black one. You have two choices on how to do this. You can buy a solid black one from a dealer, or you can modify your stock one. I choose to modify mine because I didn't want to spend $50 on something I could do myself. I basically sanded mine down and polished it back to a shine. It came out great. Check out my Sanding Procedure Here.

Firebat Decal: The decal fills in the rear "PONTIAC" indention on the rear bumper. I bought it from Firebat. They are very easy to apply when you use a soapy water solution to position them. Then just press the water out and allow 24 hours to fully dry. I've never had any problems using this method to place a decal.

KMAX SuperWhite Xe Bulbs: The KMAX bulbs are 37.5 watt replacements for the stock 27 watt fog light bulbs. The lens of the Super White Xe is optically dyed to transform the light into an intensive white beam which simulates the appearance of HID lighting systems. Check out the KMAX Bulb Install Document Here.

Vigilante 3200 Torque Converter: The Vigilante is a 9.5 inch diameter torque converter. The stall is rated at 3200 rpm, but the true stall in a LS1 is closer to 3600 rpm. I choose the Vigilante over a comparable Yank Converter based on the recommendations of a few friends. At the time I purchased the Vigilante, most were buying Yank converters. As it turned out, a lot of people with '01 and '02 LS1 cars are having problems the Yank converters. Apparently the car computers aren't as compatible with the Yanks as they are with Vigilantes. I'm very happy with my choice. The purple is kind of dorky though.

B&M Transmission Cooler: I bought a B&M transmission cooler because when you install a high stall torque converter, the transmission fluid can experience higher levels of heat. The car did come with a stock cooler from the factory, but this one suppliments the smaller stock cooler.

High Polished Calipers: The purpose of polishing the calipers is purely for appearance. They are an ugly, rough cast piece from the factory. I thought about painting my calipers, but I thought that they would look better if they matched the wheels. It's also rarely done, so it makes your car different. Check out my High Polished Caliper Procedure Here. They look ten times better in person. Digital pictures can't do them justice.

Last of the Breed badge: The Last of the Breed badge commemorates 35 years of Firebird history. The kit comes with two badges, a key chain, and a commemorative certificate. The directions tell you to place them on the fender above the vents behind the front wheel. I choose to place mine on the door in the same location that the 30th Anniversary TA's and Collector Edition TA's placed their badges.

Window Tint: I finally got tired of my car baking in the sun, and got my windows tinted. I went with a 5% limo tint on the rear, and 20% on the sides. My tint guy was able to do the rear in one piece. The car is very dark inside at night.

SLP 2 on the Left Exhaust: I choose the SLP exhaust based on price and performance. It's not very expensive for a stainless steel catback, and it's lighter than most other systems. It's a straight through design with no restirctions. It was fairly easy to install by myself, but removing the stock exhaust about killed me. The sound is very sweet. It has a nice growl when you get on it, but it is very quiet on the highway. The SLP 2OTL isn't very popular because it only has two tips on one side of the car. I like the simplicity of it. For a sound clip, click here.

Hooker Long Tube Headers and Offroad Y-Pipe: The Hooker long tubes and y-pipe are coated inside and out with Jet Hot's sterling silver finish. They look incredible. I choose not to run catalytic converters to gain a little extra performance. It does make it louder, but the SLP exhaust does a good job of quieting it down. It still screams at wide open throttle though. It sounds very muscular. I am very happy with the way the SLP exhaust compliments the long tubes. For a sound clip, click here.

John Goebel Built Tranny: My stock transmission blew up during normal driving in the summer of 2003. I went with a Goebel built A4 based on the recommendations of several guys putting over 500 hp through one of his rebuilds. The car shifts hard without a shift kit. The computer tuning was done by Chris Robinson and it's right on the money.

Yank Pro Thruster 4000 Converter: Rebuilding my A4 was a good opportunity to upgrade converters. I went big with the PT4000 and don't regret it one bit. The cars pulls a lot harder from a roll and pulls a higher mph due to an increase in efficiency over the Vigilante. The computer tuning makes it just as easy to live with as my lower stall Vig. I haven't lost any mpg, and I don't even notice the bigger stall.

TCI Deep Tranny Pan (#378000): The TCI pan holds an additional 2 quarts of trany fluid. It helps keep the tranny cooler. One nice feature is a drain plug that makes fluid changes easier. It's the lowest part on my car, so I have watch out for speed bumps.

Autometer Phantom 2 5/8" Tranny Temp Gauge: I added the Autometer Temp gauge so I could keep a closer eye on tranny temps. I was never able to see the change in temperature associated with a hard acceleration run or just going slowly in traffic. With the big stall and high performance transmission, the temps can rise quickly. I mounted it in the center A/C vent closest to the driver. It's easy to see and doesn't block much air. I've still got plenty of air flow. The gauge fit great inside the vent. It lights up red at night and matches the other interior lights fairly well.

Macewen White Face Gauges: The Macewen Gauges overlay the stock gauge face. They have an adhesive backing like a sticker. Installation is fairly easy. I am disappointed that some indicator lights are blocked. They are covered with a white frosted color. They should have made them clear like all the other number markers on the overlay. The turn signals can't even be seen in daylight, but everything is visible at night. Pretty stupid design. The white guage overlays and the white tranny temp gauge look great together.




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